Review: Sugru

17157423_10155043812785912_8639739388407831482_oRegular readers will know that we’re big fans of Sugru in the Todhunter household, so when I was offered one of their new “Create and Craft” packs of course I said yes. The Create and Craft pack is one of a new series of kits available now. You can also pick up “Organise Small Spaces” , “Hacks for Your Home” and more (click here for all the latest special editions and kits). Each kit contains everything you need to get started with Sugru and “hack” your home, garage or craft table. They would make great gifts for the diy enthusiast or crafter (or those hard to buy for uncles, brother in laws etc).

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The Create and Craft pack contains a handy tin with four packs of Sugru and a couple of useful texturising tools. Best of all, there’s a booklet filled with creative ideas and suggestions for using this brilliant mouldable glue. Whether you need to add a comfort grip to a pair of scissors, make a stamp for a quick printed wrapping paper or fix almost anything, then you need a pack of Sugru in your life. It’s strong, flexible, grippy and reliable. We made a “running repair” to our favourite cafetiere three years ago and it’s still holding up to daily use. You can find dozens of craft and design ideas over on the Sugru website.  My current favourite is this personalised mug “how to”.

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If you’ve not tried Sugru, look out for it in DIY stores, or sign up for the Sugru newsletter to get 10% off your first order. Do check out Sugru for yourself – and bookmark this handy zip fix tutorial – it’s been well road tested in this house and really works!

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My top tip for more Sugru inspiration is to follow the team on Instagram for loads of  diy / upcycling tips and dozens of crafty ideas to make.

Thanks again Sugru x

 

 

 

Capturing nature

20160723_171515For most of last year I had a personal project to try and capture the colour and textures of my garden. It was a lovely change from the challenges of commercial design work and it made the contrast between my personal designs and my commission work even more obvious.

It’s been a difficult struggle, to reconcile my beliefs in sustainable textiles and natural processes with the commercial demand for “budget” makes that many of my clients have been asking for. Acrylic yarns in particular are not “environmentally friendly”, they aren’t biodegradeable, the process of making is energy intensive and the brightly coloured dyes are often harmful, chemical based products. So,  I’ve tried to separate my commercial design work from my personal projects.

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Dyeing yarn using plant materials (not extracts or commercial dye stuff) has been a challenge and a steep learning curve. But I am loving the results and the colours I’ve achieved. Inevitably this has led on to exploring other natural processes and rediscovering some of the techniques I used in my teaching days.

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This year I’m exploring ways to capture different landscapes and locations that have a personal connection for me. It’s been good for me to learn new techniques and to spend time with other artists and practitioners who are willing to share their knowledge and enthusiasm for natural processes.

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Of course I’ll still be publishing knitting and crochet designs (which you can find over at Granny Cool) and in future issues of Inside crochet magazine I have some fantastic designs which make the best of British Wool including (finally!) the  pattern for this gorgeous crochet bag pictured here in my favourite Herdwick wool.

An Indulgent Weekend

16864106_1186849991433338_4226166083667145784_nI spent the weekend in Saltaire at textile artist Hannah Lamb’s studio. The workshop title intrigued me, “Patchwork and Place” seemed to fit so well with my own current work in progress, which aims to record places and events through stitch and textiles. My Garden Remembered (working title) project to record our own garden now continues into year two and the techniques and ideas sparked by my weekend with Hannah have moved my plans in a different direction.

16939544_1186850018100002_2624248069481218477_nOn day one, Hannah introduced us to the technique of cyanotype printing and immediately it was obvious to me that this could be the ideal way to record the flora and fauna of the garden in a way that complements last year’s experiments with solar dyes. I came home and searched through my old “teacher box” until I found some sun print paper. Using the leaves I pressed last summer along with bird feathers collected from the garden I managed some very pretty first efforts. I am now planning a whole series of pieces – once again  harnessing the power of the sun seems to be the theme of this years “garden captures”. Hannah is running an introduction to cyanotype course at her studio in May, if this is a technique that intrigues you I would definitely recommend Hannah – she is generous with her knowledge – and encouragement.16996267_1186849834766687_4976128420989220223_nThe second day was spent constructing patchwork and stitched pieces using the fabrics we had prepared on Saturday. This was tricky for me as I have never done any patchwork. I watched, asked questions and after some perseverance I did manage to finish my sample at home on Monday. I’m not sure that formal / traditional patchwork comes naturally to me. It requires patience, straight lines and a degree of accuracy that doesn’t come easily.  Like all hand stitching, the slow, meditative process of joining one piece to another was a joy. I shall definitely be working on my English paper piecing skills this year.

16998031_1186849881433349_3778062752372984237_n.jpgMr T kindly paid for my workshop as part of my Christmas present. Secretly I think he was glad of a weekend to himself, to watch the rugby uninterrupted and not be nagged to do weekend chores. For me, it was a lovely chance to observe another artist at work, to learn new skills and spend time with a lovely group of sewing enthusiasts. A weekend away might seem like an indulgence, but I think that time away has “recharged my batteries”, given me permission to be creative without the pressure of making a commercial design or a product to sell. Today I’ve been hard at work researching a new textile project that won’t involve crochet or knitting, it’s early days and so I have nothing to share yet (just scribbled notes in my sketch book , a rapidly filling Pinterest board and a shopping list that reads like a chemistry lesson). I’ve also been researching the mills of Cockermouth and discovering what a huge part linen cloth and thread played in the development of the town. There are exciting times ahead, and they definitely involve stitching…

Will Crochet Design Make Your Fortune?

Or, How do you measure success?

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OK, I’m talking about crochet design here, but this applies to all creatives. The truth is, most creative occupations won’t earn you a fortune. There are exceptions. Talent,  hard work and lucky breaks have led to a few highly successful careers in knitwear design (and other sectors).  We think that getting published in a few magazines, getting a book deal or hitting the “hot right now” stream in Ravelry* will be a spring board to fame and fortune. It might, but the chances are you won’t be able to give up the day job just yet. At least not if you’re responsible for mortgage payments, rent or  food and living expenses. Freelance crochet design will not bring you financial security. There are a few who are trying and succeeding. Talented people who have invested heavily in self publishing, mastered the art of online promotion and built a following of makers who leap on every new design with gusto. These are the lucky few. (although it isn’t really down to luck;  hard work, determination and the support of friends and family all contribute).

So, if financial security  isn’t guaranteed how else do we measure our success ?  Does it matter if money in the bank isn’t the bottom line? Freedom to live a simple life, cook from scratch, grow veg and spend time with friends and loved ones is my “success indicator”. If I worked full time, invested heavily in my brand and really, really committed myself to design then I would earn more money. But, all of the above would be neglected. I know that when I spent two days working  in London each week there were too many ready meals in the freezer, a weedy veg patch and a sulky family who  missed me. I lost touch with friends and spent weekends filled with working mother guilt trying to compensate for time spent away and  texting goodnight from trains. I felt like I failed at everything and I resented my job and my family for not being able to cope without me. The money was great, but it didn’t compensate for the things I missed.

Crochet design, writing features and occasional books won’t make my fortune, but it has brought me friendship and  job satisfaction. The money I earn feeds our family, feeds my yarn habit and most importantly sustains my creative soul. My riches aren’t money in the bank, they are small flashes of delight in an ordinary life. Of course, none of this would be possible if Mr T didn’t have a successful, rewarding job. But that doesn’t mean my work is just “play”. We have found our own “work life balance”. but it has taken us 30 years to get here!

So, will crochet make your fortune? Perhaps  not, but maybe that’s not why you crochet?

Photo Credit: Giulia Bertelli for Unsplash

 

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Can Your Blog Make You Money?

laptop.jpgA few years ago I was on a training course run by the NUJ for freelance writers. One of the subjects covered was how to make money from your blog, it was really popular among the freelancers, and for very good reasons. In this digital age it’s harder and harder to get work unless you have a great online showcase. So, the theory goes, if you’re spending all this time investing in your blog / website or social media it should earn its keep. So, how do you earn money from your blog? I stopped to think about the ways my blog makes me money and here’s just a few of the strategies I’ve tried, with varying degrees of success.

  1. Sponsored content.If a company sends you stuff for free and you write about it on your blog, that’s sponsored content. This is one of the most common ways  bloggers work for free. It’s not unusual for a craft blogger to be sent yarn, crochet hooks or books. They  might be asked to design a pattern and share it on their blog (or the company’s website) –  a great way to try out new yarns and tools – and great free endorsement for the company. Keep a note of the value of “free stuff” you’re sent, it might count as income when you complete your tax return. Ask yourself how much free work you’re prepared to undertake and look carefully at ways it might lead to a paid commission. Here’s a great post from Stephanie Lau, which shows how to credit those freebies and still create fabulous content. Most of the sponsored content on this blog is product reviews. Often I’ll approach a publisher directly and request a review copy of a new book I think my readers might like. Sometimes PR companies offer to send me stuff they think I might want to try. I’m happy with this arrangement and it works for me.
  2. Advertorial. You’ll be familiar with this if you ever read glossy magazines; when you think you’re reading a great article and suddenly realise it’s just a clever  advert. The best advertorial weaves a story  and makes you think this is a product (or products you can’t do without). If you are interested in how to write “killer” advertorial, this post is a great example of how it can be done well*. You are more likely to be paid for advertorial if you have a measurable following or can demonstrate the extent of your readership. It’s good practice to let readers know you’re being paid to write content, don’t try and pretend you just “went out and bought” that top of the range model or latest “must have” handbag, be honest and your readers will respect you more.
  3. Sidebar advertising. If there is an online shop or company you think your readers might like then a sidebar advert can be a great way to let them know about it. Decide how much you think space on your blog is worth and approach a short list of companies with your proposal. I also use the side bar to show case companies I work with as a thank you for their support. I currently have a few sidebar adverts and affiliate links (see below), I use analytics to measure how many readers click on them. I can use this to decide what kind of adverts and links are most relevant for readers of my blog and tailor content to suit.
  4. Affiliate links. There are plenty of online stores that run affiliate schemes and these can be a great way to earn extra income if you’re prepared to put in a little effort. Here’s another post by Stephanie Lau which shows just how to make affiliate links relevant to your content. Sidebar links and affiliate links can be an easy way to earn passive income (or money for doing nothing!) Once you’ve set up your links and adverts you’ll earn money every time a reader clicks through and buys. This only works successfully if you choose links and ads that are relevant to your readers. By analysing who clicks where on my website  I’ve discovered my readers are far more likely to click through to small independent shops than the “big boys” like Amazon or Love Knitting. This has helped me plan a marketing strategy for the year ahead which is more likely to bring me income.
  5. Paid Content. Unlike most  “guest blogging”, where you might be invited to write content for another  blog for free (or in return for “exposure bucks”**). Paid content actually rewards you for the work you do. There are lots of online journals and websites which pay writers. You can find lists online or get yourself a listing in online directories such as the NUJ Freelance Directory (for members only). If you are approached to write blog posts, contribute free patterns or tutorials think about how much time you spend creating that content and ask yourself how much you are prepared to give away for free.

There are literally hundreds more ways you can make money from your blog and there are lots of websites that can give you tips and ideas. You might want to head over to Kat Goldin’s blog and read this piece on passive income streams which was written with designers in mind. Also worth reading, this article from Standard Issue magazine talks about the role of “the influencer” and is well worth a read for anyone thinking of ways to make money from their online presence.

Will you lose readers if you start placing adverts, accepting sponsored content and using affiliate links? Not if you are honest about it and keep your readers entertained. Telling them about a great product and then giving them a link to where they can buy it is really helpful, and if it earns you a few pennies along the way then it’s a “win win”. Take a fresh look at your favourite blogs and podcasts, take note of how they use sponsored content, ads and affiliate links. Perhaps start with a product review or  include a recommendation in your newsletter. Try to avoid the “Yes, I’m being paid to tell you about this, but honestly,  I’d tell you anyway because I love it” trap. Instead tell your readers why you think they’d  like it and how it helped you.

Do you make money from your blog? I’d love to know what works (and what doesn’t) for you.

Photo credit: Dai KE for Unsplash

*I’ve no idea if this is a genuine post or if it’s sponsored / paid for content. But it’s  perfect example of how to weave product descriptions into your blog in an engaging way.

** Exposure bucks – a fantasy currency paid by big companies in return for your time, skills and effort. Sadly banks and supermarkets don’t accept this as legal tender so be careful how much work  you undertake for “free publicity”, links to your website or shout outs on  social media. 

 

Goodbye to Old Friends

croppedwelliesI’ve been wearing these Ilse Jacobson boots for more than 10 years. Pulled on every day they’ve been warm, reliable and incredibly comfortable. I have loved them. They’re made from natural rubber, have a thick sole and a fleecy lining. Perfect for mucking out ponies, walking dogs, gardening or scrubbed up for a photo shoot. People can’t help but comment on them –  I should really have been on commission – I must have sold at least a dozen pairs.

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Just before Christmas I realised that these beautiful,  worn in wellies would not see me through another winter. They have been patched, glued and mended too many times.  After two pairs of the same red lace up wellies I wondered if it was time to try something new and Mr T kindly bought me some Seasalt wellies  for Christmas (I’ll share when I get round to photographing them). They don’t have the same warm lining or the same style, and everyone says “Oh, Seasalt wellies – snap.” when I wear them. That’s not   bad thing of course, and I do have a deep love for all things Seasalt, but I do like to be just  a little bit different. I like to do the unexpected occasionally.

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I love these red wellies so much though, maybe I’ll just keep them as photo props. That would be OK wouldn’t it?

So, You Want to be a Writer?

s9cc2skysjm-green-chameleonWhenever I tell people I’m a writer the most common response is “I’ve always wanted to be writer, but I don’t know how”.  I have always been compelled to write, I never really stopped to think about the how. The first story I remember writing was science fiction. I was 7 years old and a babysitter had left behind a Marvel comic. I was fascinated by a picture book for grown ups  and wrote story after story about the figures sketched in its pages. In my teens I found my niche writing features and after the local paper published my first piece when I was 15 I was determined that’s what I would do for a living, it didn’t become my full time job until my 40’s, but it’s simmered along while l I did other jobs that paid the bills and put food on the table.  I still long to write a novel and there is a character inside me who insists his story should be told, but I’m not ready to give him a life of his own yet. For now, I walk briskly in the forest as his fictional life evolves in my head.

Now, I’ll let you into a secret. Writing is easy, you just pick up a pen and get on with it. Writing something other people want to read, now that’s the hard bit! I used to be a teacher, then a teacher trainer. I’ve taught everyone, from three year olds to pensioners and the same advice is relevant to all of you. Practice, practice, practice. Like riding a bike or learning the piano, writing is a skill that rewards effort. Here’s my top three tips to being a better writer, follow these and you can only get better (and if that’s prompted a D:Ream earworm click here and sing along).

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Number One: Write. Write every day. Keep a journal, write a diary, hand write a letter to an old friend. Make up a story about the couple sitting in front of you on the bus, pen a poem. Don’t worry about the spelling, the grammar or  the syntax, just type or scribble down the words. Do this every day and soon you’ll discover a style, your “voice”. You’ll find it easier to write that first sentence, If you really struggle,  there are websites with writing prompts to get you started. Make time every day to write something. Even if you can only manage ten minutes, you’ll find the discipline of daily writing soon becomes something you look forward to. Start a blog, write a daily Facebook update (my lovely friend Archies Diaries started that way and became an Amazon best seller!), make a list of far away friends and family and write them a letter. Plan your novel and give yourself a word or page target for every day. Full disclosure – some of best writing happens in my head on my daily walk and never makes it to paper – I need to learn to take my own advice.

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Number Two: Read. Read “all” the time. Honestly, being a great reader will make you a better writer. Widen your horizons, whether you borrow library books, read online or pick up your books second hand it doesn’t matter. Reading improves your vocabulary, teaches you about plot development and structure. It widens your world. If you worry about grammar, spelling or the conventions of writing then you need to read more, you’ll soon notice how great writers break the “rules”. Think about your favourite writers, study how they structure their work, what makes it so appealing to you. It’s never good form to copy another writer’s work, but being inspired by a story you’ve read and using it as  a spring board for your own work is perfectly acceptable. After I read Freya North’s The Turning Point I was so devastated by the ending that I had to write myself an alternative future for the heroine, Frankie and her children. Not because Freya North had done a bad job – the complete opposite – in three days of binge reading  I had lived and breathed with her heroine and reaching the final page  was too painful, I wasn’t ready to let her go. *

Number Three: Ignore the rules. If you spend your days stressing that your spelling is abysmal or your grammar and punctuation let you down, stop worrying. Get the words on the page and everything else can be dealt with later. Run your work through a spell checker, find a friend who will proof read and edit (don’t choose one who gets carried away with the red pen. It can be soul destroying to have your work returned with hundreds of minor corrections). If you really believe you have produced a piece of work fit to show an editor, find yourself a professional proof reader or technical editor  who will lick your work into shape (for a small fee of course). There will be days when you have nothing to say, or times when you reach a block (believe me that exists), after my last book I lost my “mojo” for several months. All I could write were hasty postcards and a few short paragraphs for patient editors who understood and gave me time to recover. My design work stalled completely. Samples were made and ready to post, but I just couldn’t type the words needed into the pattern template.

Of course, most of this advice is just stating the obvious, you knew all this already. Perhaps you’ve just been waiting for someone to give you permission to write. In which case, close this tab. Open a word document;  call it “My Writing” and type your first sentence. I look forward to an invitation to read your first blog post, attend your book launch or just get a letter, written by hand.

Go write x

*You should note that the Turning Point is the most beautifully crafted novel and it’s only if you read it that you’ll understand my sens of losse when I finished reading.

Photo Credits:

Green Chameleon for Unsplash

Parker Byrd for Unsplash

Aaron Burden for Unsplash

 

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A Weekend in Pictures

Weekends are for sitting by the fire, reading books, drinking coffee and indulgence. At least that’s the plan. It rarely happens in this house! I’ve been indulging in a lazy weekend, relishing time alone with just box sets and chick lit for company.

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I cleaned my boots – oh that colour! These boots make me smile every time I wear them. . It’s just a bonus that my scarf is all matchy matchy! Note to self, if you decide to walk over the fields to buy the weekend papers, don’t wear suede boots!

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I made a pot of coffee and sat by the fire. I read trashy chick lit on my  Kindle and I watched  Greys Anatomy (again).

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I did some weeding, and when it got dark I came inside. I opened a bottle of wine and sat by the fire. I read the  papers and I watched Greys Anatomy (again).

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I ate left overs for breakfast. I did as I pleased. I gave myself permission to step off the work / design / housework treadmill. I had the best weekend. If this is slow living I am definitely happy in the slow lane. I hope your weekend was happy too.

Here’s to Monday x

How I Fell in Love with Instagram

rkz2iypkliy-juliette-leufkeI’m a huge fan of Instagram, I resisted it’s lure for a long time. I preferred Twitter. But, things change. After 10 years on Twitter I felt I had “lost” my community, the conversations, the day to day interaction with friends far and near began to change. I needed to look in new places. I learned to love my Instagram by asking myself these questions, as I answered them,  I realised that the community I was looking for was already there, I just had to  say hello.

Disclaimer: This isn’t a post about how to “grow” your followers or make your “Insta” fortune. There are plenty of people offering paid and unpaid advice on that – you can google them!

  1. Why are you here? Ask yourself (and answer honestly). What drew you to Instagram? . I’m nosey (most writers are) and so I like to follow people who share the day to day rather than a contrived schedule of posts. If  people are kind enough to hit the “heart” button on my photos, click through to read my blog or follow me I take that as a compliment and I’ll try and reciprocate. Until I sat down to write this post I had no idea how many followers I had, to be honest I don’t look.   I’m more interested in seeing the familiar faces in my feed, people who take the time to let me know they’ve seen and enjoyed my photos. I look at their feeds too and sometimes I’ll leave a comment or “like” their pictures. I’ve met some lovely people this way and reconnected with old friends. If your bottom line is more followers, this isn’t the post for you. Stop reading now, you’ll just be disappointed.
  2. Are you striving for perfect pictures? Real life is not the same as Instagram Reality – if you don’t believe me, take a look at the “#authentic” hashtag – is that your reality? Mine’s muddy boots, dirt under the finger nails, disorderly mugs on worktops and try as I might it will never look “right”.  I post pictures that share a story of my every day life. It might be my garden, a new design I’ve published or a holiday snapshot. I don’t spend hours editing my photos or composing pithy straplines. Most of my pictures are random, spur of the moment images. If other people like them it’s nice to know. But, I don’t set out each week with a plan or a timetable. I just like sharing and I love listening to people.
  3. Do you care about the “Algorithm”? If your answer is “what algorithm?” you’re in the right place, keep reading. If beating the algorithm is your goal, stop reading now, try here instead.* Like all social media platforms, Instagram uses complex algorithms, designed to improve your viewing experience (eugh!), what you see in your feed is largely dictated by what you’ve liked and commented on, “like” cute dogs  and it’s probable these are what you’ll see first in your feed next time you log in.  There are many, many people out there who will give you free or paid for advice on “beating” the algorithm.
  4. What’s more important quality or quantity? When I used to advise clients on using social  media for their business or their charity they were often too concerned with the wrong numbers. They would constantly be checking their follower counts, getting excited when they grew and dismayed when they fell. Let’s be honest, we’re all fickle. If you don’t post interesting or relevant stories people will stop following you. perhaps, like me they aren’t comfortable following large numbers of people they will never interact with.  Over the last few months I’ve noticed the same familiar faces popping up in my feed, we’ve stuck up conversations and enjoyed shared moments of joy, laughter and frustration. If it’s “numbers” you want then go buy followers or install an app that will find followers for you. Or, read blogs like this with tips for growth.
  5. Are you using hashtags “properly”? I’ll assume you know what a hashtag is. If you don’t,  read this first. Hashtags help you share your stuff with like minded Instagrammers who don’t already follow you. I don’t have a set of hashtags I always use, nor do I set out with a plan of tags I want to include. Sometimes (and the “experts” will tell you this is wrong, wrong, wrong) I’ll go back and edit a post to include a hashtag I’ve just discovered. For example,I went through my own feed on Friday night, adding the tag #bakingandmaking to some of my pictures – some of them several weeks or months  old. Some of these even made it to “top post” status  – meaning that when people search that tag, my pictures are the first ones they see. I noticed lots of new followers and likes in my feed the next morning, many of whom share my tastes and I went over and followed them too.** A happy meeting of similar minds and (maybe) new friends made.  If you are looking to find communities of like minded people I’ve added a few hashtag suggestions to the end of this post for you to explore.

So, here’s what I want you to “take away” from this post: It’s your Instagram and you should use it in a way that works best for you. Post what you want, when you want. Whether you want to grow your audience, “monetise” your Instagram or just find like minded people,  the single most important thing you can do is post great photos which resonate with your intended audience.  Couple this with a sentence (or a long, rambling  paragraph if you wish) and you’re on to a winner.

See you on Instagram x

Photo credit:  Juliette Leufke for Unsplash

  • ps that link is just for fun, not a recommendation!
  • **Beware automated likes generated by bots – these aren’t genuine – if your follower numbers are fluctuating up and down it might be you’re using a hashtag on a “bot” list. Ignore the numbers  and focus on the people who show up in your feed a few times – they are the ones who are real!

Community hashtag suggestions:

Craftastherapy

crochetgirlgang

modernmakers

makingwinter

booklover

knittersofinstagram

writersofinstagram

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The Art of Slow Living

gathering-woodMove over Hygge, it appears 2017 is the “year of slow living”.  No-one really seems sure where this movement started. Perhaps it was inspired by the Slow Food Movement, or maybe it’s just a response to the fact that “life moves pretty fast” these days, and to paraphrase Ferris Bueller, if you don’t stop and look around once in a while you might miss it. I’ve been following (and occasionally using)  the #slowliving hashtag on Instagram for a couple of years. Here you’ll find hundreds of misty, slight griege* pictures of tea in hand thrown mugs, resting on scrubbed pine tables, crumpled bed linen and carefully composed flat lays (items laid on tables, photographed from above). But, there’s more to slow living than composing a beautiful photo and scripting the perfect caption.  The trouble is, my life is messy, colourful and random, so my photos stand out like a sore thumb in the hashtag feed. My real life is not Instagram friendly!

eden-cottage-hatI like to think of my  life as a journey, not a destination. I derive pleasure form the “doing” and the “making” of life, not just life itself.  I relish the process of cooking meals from scratch, hand stitching my clothes and growing food for the table. Making time for coffee with friends, watching the goldfinches squabble over the bird feeder or just  enjoying a hug from Mr T (always time for that) when I take him a mug of tea is important to me. I try to find joy in the mundane; whether it’s filling the log basket, sorting the recycling or wrangling the laundry.  I think (and you might disagree, that’s ok), that if we’re constantly wishing we were doing something else, we’re in danger of missing out on the simple pleasure of life itself. If I didn’t wander around my garden every day to forage twigs for kindling I would miss the first snowdrops appearing at the bottom of the garden. I wouldn’t notice the bird nest in the clematis, which is only visible now the leaves have all dropped off.  If I didn’t change the bed sheets every week I wouldn’t get to relish snuggling into freshly laundered cotton (I have thing for crisp, white linen and feather pillows).  I’m interested to know how others live life in the slow lane, which is why I follow the hashtag. I tried to think about what makes my life a slow life and over the next few weeks I’ll share my own art of slow living. To kick off –  here’s the one I struggle with most – balancing my online life with “real” life.

Mastering  the art of tech life balance

I’m not talking about a digital detox (ugh what a horrible expression  that is), instead learning to balance my  life online with real world experiences. We don’t need to be constantly checking email, counting “retweets” on Twitter or scrolling through carefully curated and scripted photos on Instagram. My online life is a huge part of my interaction with others, working from home I’ve often called Twitter “my water cooler moment”, so I struggle with the concept of a “detox”. Instead I try to build time online into my day, I try to avoid constantly picking up my phone to read emails or look at Instagram. In fact, I quite often turn off the wifi on my phone and switch off my tablet for a few hours each day so I can work on designs or write undisturbed.

After tea I try to put my “devices” away, switch off the laptop and have real conversations. We’ll settle down to read books, watch a box set or spend time with friends and at these times “device checking” is frowned upon. Of course we break the rules, I might spend half an hour having a Facebook chat with a far away friend or Mr T might check out what his friends are up to on Strava. But we follow a few unspoken “rules”, no device checking at mealtimes, no jumping up to answer the phone in the middle of a conversation and the only electronic device in the bedroom is my kindle. And here’s the thing, iplayer has given us so much freedom to choose what we watch and when that I forget what life was like when you had to timetable TV watching into your day so you didn’t miss call the Midwife!  Our smart TV has given us freedom and flexibility. It is “good” technology and I won’t hear a bad word said against it!

Today I went for a walk, my phone was in my pocket but it was switched off and I relished being “uncontactable”. We’re not a technology driven family; if we want to turn down the thermostat we get up and turn a knob, we don’t reach for an app on a phone. We don’t have sat nav – we are “old school” and carry maps. Technology allows Mr T to work from home, he spends his day on Skype calls, sharing screens and logging into client databases. No wonder he’s happy to leave technology behind after a day in the office (aka the smallest bedroom). The internet allows me to sell my patterns, research ideas and keep in touch with fellow designers, editors and friends who live to far away to drop in for a cuppa.  Technology is an aid to efficiency, but it can also make us slaves.

Of course technology is not just about being “connected”. Try making a loaf of bread by hand instead of throwing everything in a bread maker, whip egg whites for a meringue by hand or make pastry. Take a map when you go for a walk instead of plugging routes into a GPS. Look up from your screen, look out of the window and talk to a real person not a Gravatar once in a while. Read your toddler a story from a book instead of passing them your ipad. Build a den under the dining table, make time to talk and to listen no matter how bored you are with reading the Very Hungry Caterpillar or singing the same song over and over again. The greatest gift you can give to your loved ones is time and technology can suck that away from us if we’re not careful.  I know this because my own daughter spent far too many hours watching Barney and playing Sims while I attempted to “work from home” in her early years (and yes, I still  carry the guilt of the working Mother). I thought technology would make me more efficient, more productive. It just made me a slave to my inbox.

How do you balance life and technology? Do you use an app to switch on your kettle / turn on the lights? Do you find yourself checking Facebook during ad breaks? I’m fascinated by how we all adapt and respond to the growing technologies that promise to make our lives easier and more  efficient. Do they? I’d love to know how you find a tech life balance –  maybe you already have the answer?

*griege – those slightly grey / sepia / muted images that are so common on Instagram. Read “everything you need to know about griege”  here.

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  • Beautiful colours! New colours of @edencottageyarns Milburn 4 ply. Destined for a shawl, just for me, not a design commission or work project. Just an excuse to indulge in beautiful yarn. Shown here are Bramble, Catmint and Rain. Also there is a new ECY facebok group called ECY Garden - go check it out. 
#knittersofinstagram #knittersofig #igknitters #tricot #knittersoftheworld #yarnlove #britishwool  #britishyarn #loveknitting #lovecrochet #happyknitter #knittingaddict #transformyouryarn #crochet #igcrochet #bakingandmaking #slowliving #theartofslowliving #nofilter Lichen. Colour inspiration in unlikely places. Saw these rocks & my first thought was "ooh perfect colours for a shawl" (& I'm pretty sure that @thefibrecompany has all these shades in its Cumbria fingering). Looks like last weeks big fat royalty cheque is about to be splurged on yarn!!
#colourhunter #lichen #naturelovers #grellow #knittersofinstagram #inspiredbynature #slowliving #thisthingcalledslowliving #theartofslowliving Garter stitch & great yarn = perfect knitting. I picked up this Koigu premium merino on my last visit to @looplondonloves & now I'm teaching my teenage neighbour to knit a little shawlette - much more fun than a garter stitch scarf!
#koigu #makeitkoigu #knitting #knittersofinstagram #shawl #iloveknitting #learntoknit #garterstitchlove #knitaddict #knittersofig #transformyouryarn #yarnlove #merino I love my new socks! This is the first time I've used @kingcoleltd Zig Zag sock yarn & it's great. I bought this from the Silver Beaded Needle in Cockermouth. I'm loving their new larger premises & expanded yarn section.
#toeuptuesday #sockknittersofinstagram #sockknitters #sockknitting #toeupsocksrock #operationsockdrawer #slowliving #theartofslowliving #thisthingcalledslowliving #bakingandmaking #cockermouth #shoplocal Lawn cut & crochet blankets getting an airing, it must be spring!
#crochet #grannysquare  #grannysquaresrock #crochetgirlgang #crochetblanket #crochetmotif #bakingandmaking #crochetgeek #crochetaddict #crochetersofinstagram #igcrochet My favourite make - this woman - my daughter. Wearing handmade of course! Celebrate spring with a floral pin cushion! There's a link in my profile with all the details, free pattern & more ideas for Mothers Day gifts 
#crochet #crochetgirlgang #crochetconcupiscence #crochetaddict #crochetgifts #freepattern #bakingandmaking Finally some crochet! Five years ago I designed these little bags for the  wool shop where I worked I  still make them for wrapping presents - so much nicer (& more sustainable) than paper or plastic.  Link in my profile for details & free pattern. 
#crochet #crochetgirlgang  #crochetgeek #crochetaddict #bakingandmaking #mothersday #giftwrapping #reducereuserecycle #zerowaste Sunshine on a rainy day. I've hung this on my kitchen wall, rather pleased with this simple print of 3 plants from my garden (the middle one is from the tiny christmas tree we were given in December at Delamere Forest) 
#cyanotype #sunprint #surfacepattern #inmygarden #bakingandmaking #delamereforest
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