Elderberry Recipe Ideas

Elder (Sambucus Nigra)

Elderberries

The elderberries are starting to ripen, offering the promise of autumn cordials, jams and chutnies. Many people are aware that an elderberry cordial or syrup can help soothe a cough or cold, but they also have dozens of culinary uses. My favourite crumble is a mixture of apples, elderberries and blackberries all foraged from the garden. You can also use them to make wines and chutney. I also use them in the solar dye posts to make a beautiful pink shade of wool.

You need to strip the berries from the stems first. The easiest way to do this is to run a fork downwards from the stems and let the berries fall into a bowl. Even simpler , freeze them on the stems and you can easily strip them when ready to use them. The berries in my garden ripen in stages (one side of the tree gets more sun than the other), so I freeze them until I’m ready to use them otherwise the birds eat them before I can enjoy them.  The stems are inedible and the berries slightly toxic raw. Please be careful if you’re new to foraging that you identify the tree correctly, at this time of year there are lots of bright black berries in the forest and not all of them are edible. If in doubt leave them on the tree. We’re lucky enough to have large elder trees in the garden, but the edges of the local fields also offer a ready supply. Try not to gather from the roadside because of car fumes and always rinse in water before use.

Elderbierries steeping in a solar dye pot

Elderberries in the dye pot

I’ll share pictures of some of my favourite recipes as I make them. Meanwhile,  if you need inspiration here are links to some of my favourite recipes and uses. There are also lots of great foraging courses at this time of year, so do look out for one local to you.

The Woodland Trust: Elderberry wine

Robin Harford: Elderberry Cordial

Foods of England: Elderberry Chutney

 

 

Pictures of Tiny Things: Oak Galls

Oak Knopper Gall Andricus quercuscalicis

Oak Knopper Gall (Andricus quercuscalicis)

Oak trees are my favourite tree. I love the shape of the leaves and the way the acorns change from shiny green to nut brown. Best of all, I love searching for oak galls, caused by tiny parasitic wasps, these “oak apples” and galls come in various shapes and sizes. If you look closely, you can spot them among the leaves, and occasionally pick them up from the forest floor in autumn. I am fascinated by their shapes and textures.

Oak Marble Gall Andricus kollari

Oak Marble Gall (Andricus kollari) like round hard marbles.

Delamere Forest has some beautiful oak trees, and right now they are a covered in tiny acorns, which seem to swell each day. It won’t be long before the squirrels can be spotted munching away, or more likely burying them in the leaf litter.

Oak Common Spangle Gall Neuroterus quercusbaccarum

Oak Common Spangle Gall (Neuroterus quercusbaccarum)

Oak galls can be used to make ink (I’ll share that process later in the year), but right now, grab a small child or rekindle those memories of school nature walks (a weekly outing in my 1960’s and early 70’s education) and go oak gall spotting.

Oak Artichoke Gall Andricus fecundator

Oak Artichoke Gall (Andricus fecundator)

I photographed these earlier this week in Delamere Forest, Cheshire. I was able to spot several kinds and identified them online from the photos I took. Not like the “old days” when I had to pore over the Spotter’s Guides or go to the library. A good place to start is the Trees for Life website, which has  detailed section on plant galls,  not just oaks. Once you start to slow down and look around you, all kinds of flora and fauna reveal themselves. Every day I spot something new, another small gift for choosing slow!

 

Embrace the Now

ApplesThe seasons are changing, but I’m not ready to let the late summer give way to autumn just yet. In the garden, the pinks, purples and yellows of mid summer are slowly giving way to jewel bright reds and blacks as the trees become laden with berries. There are huge rosehips and the rowan trees are covered with red berries. The apple tree is heavy with fruit, it looks like we’ll get our best crop ever. The hazel trees are full of nuts, which means the squirrels are gathering. But it’s not autumn yet (despite what “Instagram” is saying, the changing colours, bronzing of the leaves, copper tones in the bracken are normal for this time of year). They reveal the promise of autumn’s bounty, and yet we still have summer skies, warm afternoons and plenty of sunshine to enjoy. Late summer offers so much, the opportunity to spend time with friends, and with the kids before they go back to school. Some of my clearest summer memories are of late summer blackberry forays, climbing trees still in full leaf and discovering that elder berries are bitter and best eaten cooked, not straight from the tree!

elderberries.jpg

I think we’re prone to forgetting that late summer offers us so much. I have ripe, red raspberries. The elder berries aren’t ripe yet, but the deep red stems are so beautiful and I love to admire the light as it filters through. In a few weeks the starlings and blackbirds will strip them in a matter of days  if I don’t get there first.

Before we rush headlong into autumn (which, if I’m honest)  is my favourite season), let’s just slow down and admire the now. There’s plenty of time to gather together all those autumn recipes for pickles, gins and cordials. Sit in the garden and enjoy the late afternoon sun if you can. Pick the late summer vegetables and last of the soft fruits. Take a moment to reflect on how beautiful this time of year can be, forget the rainy days that caused a change in summer plans. Go for a walk in the woods, on the beach or your local park. The blue skies are out there if you take the time to look!

20160108_111614

Embrace the prospect of autumn, but don’t forget to enjoy the now. Why not start by making a simple fruit cordial? I shared my recipe for redcurrant cordial way back in 2011 and I’m still using the same recipe today. You can swap the redcurrants for any summer fruit (or even a combination), my favourite this year has been rhubarb and raspberry.  If those rainy days threaten to spoil your outdoor fun, making a batch of cordial is a terrific way to bring some summer into your life – you can even use a bag of frozen berries – call it domestic foraging!

 

 

 

Busy Doing Nothing

Sometimes I wear my “busyness” like a badge of honour. Being “busy” equates with success and achievement. On holiday, I noticed that I was far happier  when I was “not busy”. Those days when I sat by the pool, meandered around the garden or strolled down to a local cafe to mooch and enjoy an espresso with Mr T were some of the loveliest days I’ve had this year. We relished having nothing to do, nowhere to be and no-one to please but ourselves.

I came home with a sketch book full of ideas, swatches for new designs, hundreds of photos taken with my new camera and I refound my creativity. It’s the first holiday in years when I haven’t felt homesick within a few days of arriving. The beautiful gardens surrounding our holiday cottage were so wonderful we didn’t feel the need to stray far from home. We didn’t “tick off” many tourist destinations, we hardly ate out and we spent very little. What did we do? We swam, Mr T cycled. We visited the local towns and markets, bought local cheese, meats and honey (oh yes, and wine of course). We cooked simple meals, we talked, listened to each other and in the interests of full disclosure I should tell you we spent  more afternoons than we should enjoying a “siesta”! We watched TV coverage of the Tour de France (and saw some of it in the flesh), we didn’t feel the need to apologise for wasting our time in such trivial ways.

Since we came home, I’ve tried really hard to spend time doing “nothing”. Every day I have taken an hour out to go for a walk or tend the garden. I’ve been happier, less stressed out by deadlines and negotiating commissions. There have even been days when I’ve pulled the cobwebs off the deck chair and sat in the shade under the hazel trees to read a book.

This time, usually early in the mornings has often been the best part of the day. Disconnected from the internet, phone on silent I have been more aware of nature and more aware of the people who matter. For the past week, each day has begun with a walk in the local forest. I wasn’t aware of the concept of “Forest Bathing” until recently, but the idea that being outdoors is good for mental and physical well being isn’t a surprise to me. Ask any gardener, and they’ll wax lyrical about how much better they feel after an hour of weeding, dead heading or pulling up weeds – even the mundane tasks improve our moods!

The other thing I’ve noticed is this: No-one has noticed I’ve been disconnected! Nobody has noticed that I haven’t been answering emails, posting online, commenting or responding until late in the morning, sometimes not  even in the afternoons. In short, my day has started later and yet I’ve achieved the same, sometimes more in less time and in a better frame of mind.”

Slowly, very slowly I’m losing the need to appear busy to outside observers. I don’t feel the need to justify how I’ve spent my day or have something concrete to show off. Busy doing “nothing” is probably when I’ve been most creative, happy and above all, content.

I just wish I had learned this lesson in my twenties, not my fifties!

 

A Small Win for Zero Waste Beauty

I’ve been huge fan of Aveda for years*. Make up is sold in refillable compacts, ingredients are not tested on animals and best of all, if you order by post the packaging is plastic free (no sign of that pesky plastic tape I complained about in a previous post about our attempts to live plastic free). The Aveda packaging pictured above can all be reused. The box will most likely be used to send a commission design to a client, the shredded cardboard will go in the compost . Worms love cardboard, and at this time of year it’s a useful addition to mix with the huge amount of greenery and grass that is accumulating. Aveda’s plastic containers are made of at least 85% post consumer waste plastic and the empties can be recycled or taken back to the store . They have also pioneered the use of bio plastics and plant based packaging.

Used with  my crochet washable cleanser pads or washable face cloths this makes my beauty routine pretty close to zero waste.washable make up remover pads.jpgFor me, zero waste isn’t about recycling more, it’s about buying less in the first place and making sure the companies I buy from have considered the life cycle of their raw materials. It’s not enough to just print “recyclable where facilities  are available” on the side of a bottle. I want to buy from companies that use materials that  can be used again and again. Even better if they can be refilled and reused.  I’d be so much happier if we went back to the “old days” when you could take your empties back to the Body Shop.  (The Body Shop stopped offering refills in 2002, according to the Independent, because only 1% of consumers used the service). In the UK, very few shops offer a refill service, but I have a feeling this is going to change as the demand for plastic free packaging hots up.

Of course, making your own beauty products is the “holy grail” of zero waste, but  I’m not really enthused by the idea of home made soap, toothpaste and deodorant. For now, I’m calling this plastic free parcel from Aveda  a win in my goal for a less cluttered, uncomplicated life.

  • This post is not sponsored. All products  were bought, not provide free of charge in return for review or mentions on social media

 

Save

Something for the Weekend: Flapjack

A Slice of FlapjackI do love a quick and easy bake, and these fit the bill perfectly. Ideal for a quick Saturday morning bake, especially if you need to find something the little ones can help with. They are best eaten with a steaming mug of tea, in front of a roaring fire. The end of July might not be the best time to be saying that – but blimey it’s cold and wet up North today I can tell you.

This flapjack was an experiment to reproduce the cereal bars Mr T is very fond of and often takes with him on his cycling trips. The shop bought versions cost around £2 and the ingredients list stretches to over 20 items (several of which I’m not convinced are actual “food”). This version might not be the “healthiest” cereal bar, but it’s packed with honest, real foods and tastes delicious. I made a cranberry and almond version, which is pictured here. You can also make a very yummy maple and pecan special edition by swapping the honey for maple syrup and using roughly chopped pecans in place of the almonds.  I’m tempted to try a cranberry and white chocolate version or dark chocolate and crystalised ginger.

In the recipe, you’ll find advice on making gluten free, vegan and refined sugar free versions. I’m a big fan of recipes that can be tweaked to individual preferences. I know coconut oil is the “go to” oil of the moment, but I like good old fashioned butter. If you need a dairy free version then Coconut oil is a good option, if expensive. Look out for the cuisine versions which don’t have a coconutty taste.

I’ve used chia seeds in this version. My flapjack is always a bit of a risk, sometimes it can be too soft and doesn’t hold together. I’ve tried adding flour, crushed cornflakes and all kinds of other ways to help bind the mixture together. A friend suggested chia seeds and the result was soft, chewy and held together remarkably well. I’m not convinced by their superfood status, but in this recipe they worked for me.

A Tray of Flapjack

Cranberry and Almond Flapjack

Photographing them was a challenge – not only tricky to get the right light in my gloomy kitchen – Mr T and I also munched our way through a few in the process. I’ve just upgraded to a digital camera after years of making do with my phone, it’s a steep learning curve! Anyway, don’t be put of by the amateur pictures, try them for yourself. You can find the full Cranberry and Almond Flapjack recipe here.

 

 

Sometimes it’s OK to have too much

There are some things you can never have too much of and in a world where I’m trying to live with less, today I’m celebrating abundance. In my world there can never be enough friendship, love or creativity, but I feel oppressed when I’m surrounded by too much unnecessary “stuff”. I try to see having too much as a welcome opportunity to share, celebrate and find joy in excess.

Aren’t these sunflowers beautiful? I took this photo on holiday in France last week. We were driving to the local market when I shouted out to Mr T that he must “stop the car now”. We spent at least ten minutes gazing at their beauty, the field seemed to go on forever and we were mesmerised. They may seem gaudy and excessive to you, but I am transported back to that sunny day every time I looked at that picture.

On holiday, we seemed to have too much of everything. No wifi meant we weren’t distracted by emails, social media or checking our phones for updates there was time to just sit and talk. We rented a cottage from an English lady who was bemused by our lack of intention. Did we not have  a list of places to go and things to see? Did we want her to recommend restaurants and bistros? No, we were content to visit the market, buy bread and cheese for lunch, which we spent watching the Tour de France. We spoke to the locals who pointed us in the direction of tiny coffee shops, we drank espresso and visited places you won’t find in the tourist brochures. We came across the remains of a Roman bath house next to a municipal car park and a beautiful garden tended by a 103 year old French man who insisted we took away garlic and artichokes from his plot. We had lazy breakfasts and we sat in silence watching the sunsets.

We celebrated having too much time, too much sunshine and delicious wine. We enjoyed the company of birds and butterflies and when Mr T went out on his bike I swam in the pool and read books (averaging one a day, sheer luxury). We truly were busy “doing nothing” and it was bliss.

I truly believe that you can never have too much of a good thing. Having too much is the perfect excuse to share and to give. My garden is a perfect example right now. After two weeks of neglect while we were on holiday, there is plenty of everything (especially weeds and long grass, but I’m calling that a wild flower meadow and the bees are happy). Gluts of soft fruit mean visits to the neighbours to offload excess, resulting in conversations, shared coffees and exchanging gooseberries for radishes or carrots. I’m making fruit flavoured gins and vodkas to give away at Christmas and of course I’m freezing, making jam and ensuring there will be good things to eat in winter.

Whatever you have too much of, find a way to share it, rather than discarding or wasting it. Whether it’s money, time or food, small acts of sharing make us feel better. I’m not talking about organised volunteering or philanthropy, just the small acts of kindness that can become part of every day. Buying a couple of extra items in the supermarket and popping them in the Food Bank collection point. Gifting your unwanted books to a community library or even just taking the time to chat to a lonely neighbour instead of dashing inside when you get home from work. An added bonus is that you’ll find this kindness returned in unexpected ways. We have a green house gifted by a neighbour who had become too infirm to enjoy his garden, he was going to sell it, but overheard my husband telling a friend I wanted one but couldn’t afford it. My freezer is full of a friend’s “glut” of raspberries and my wardrobe full of charity donations.

Celebrate excess, seize the opportunities and remember that sometimes it’s OK to feel good about having too much.

This is an extended version of a post that originally appeared on Medium.

What I’m Reading

We’re in full holiday prep mode this week and  I’ve just got back from Woolfest (an annual celebration of wool, natural fibre and British sheep breeds). The house is piled up with samples, swatches and notes for my new book and so I have barely found time to write a blog post!

Instead, here’s a round up of what I’ve been  reading (and watching) this week.

On the blogs, Regula Ysewijn has been articulating the unease lots of us are feeling about the rise of what I call “big organic”, with Amazon’s recent bid to acquire US company Wholefoods, is it time we reconnected with the local? Read Regula’s piece here. I definitely believe life is better when we buy good food, from local people.

While I was at Woolfest, the team behind Murmurations organised an truly inspiring event at Storyhouse in Chester. Thanks to social media, I have managed to follow much of the conversation. Check out their feed on Instagram or twitter for a taste of the inspiring stories. With speakers including Sheila Dillon, Charlie Gladstone and many more. It’s certainly true we get the communities we deserve, so if you want to see real change, you have to contribute!

Slightly different, (but still resonating with my journey to slow) have any of you been watching BBC’s Handmade in Japan series? It’s still available on iplayer, where you can watch this fascinating insight into the traditional Japanese Kimono

On my bedside table you’ll find “The Man Who made Things Out of Trees”. Written by by Robert Penn, this  is a truly fascinating insight into the crafts people who make beautiful things from wood. Definitely worth a read if you appreciate hand made, small scale production.  There’s a review in the Guardian, and if you’re intrigued find it in your local independent book shop or library.

Finally, I’m reading issue 2 of Tortoise Chester. This new independent magazine is a celebration of creativity and “slow” in the broadest sense. I didn’t manage to track down a copy of issue 1 as we were on holiday when it came out and my trawl of Chester’s independent shops failed to turn up a copy (pleased it was so popular, but gutted). So, when I heard issue 2 would be available at Murmurations I managed to persuade a friend to drop a copy through my letterbox on her way home.

For the next two weeks, Mr T and I will be in France. I’m hoping to watch a little bit (a lot) of the Tour de France, explore French markets, boulangerie and wine producers. There will be plenty of lazy mornings, long warm evenings and I hope to come back refreshed and full of enthusiasm for my next book and finally able to share with you some new clients I’m writing for.

Have a sunny July xx

 

 

My Zero Waste Travel Essentials

Zero waste travel essentials –  bag, Alpkit spork, water bottle and a flask

Mr T and I love to travel. We like to wander and explore, to discover great cafes and local food. We have always travelled light (one rucksack each, hand luggage only – except for a 3 week trip to America when we also  took a suitcase between three of us). We have visited  over a dozen European cities by train, always making do with what we can carry on our backs. Often we have a tiny budget and that has led to several zero waste strategies almost by accident.

This time last year we were in Copenhagen, a long promised treat. This was also the first holiday where I deliberately set out to think about the  waste  our holiday would create and made a plan to avoid as much disposable plastic as we could. I was surprised how easy it was, and here are my tips based on that experience. This isn’t a sponsored post, I’ve included links to some of my favourite tried and tested products all of which Mr T and I have bought over the years.

  1. Do your research. We made sure to check out the sustainability policies of the hotel before we booked. You can usually find this on the hotel website (check out Macdonald Hotels website for an example). We chose a great, mid priced  hotel (with a gin bar!) that supplied toiletries in refillable wall mounted containers (no tiny “complimentary” bottles) ; showers not baths and supplied real cups and glasses to every room. If in doubt, ask. Most hotels are happy to oblige with requests such as “please can we have a small  jug of real milk instead of UHT cartons”. If your room supplies plastic cups, pop down to the bar and ask for a real glass, just because it’s in your room doesn’t mean you have to use it. Same with bottled water, snacks in the mini bar or freebies you don’t need and won’t use. Just leave them for the next occupant.
  2. Be prepared. We always travel with a few essentials. A flask for coffee (most hotels will fill it for you over breakfast and it’s cheaper than buying a coffee on your journey). My Platypus water bottle is probably my favourite. When empty, you can fold it up and pop it in your back pocket or rucksack, when you stop for coffee or lunch ask your waiter to refill it from the tap (never been refused). A spork , this one came from Alpkit and it’s great for camping or for take aways on holiday. A reusable bag is a must, use it to carry shopping, kindling on the beach or wet swimming gear. Ours came from Onya. If you have room, a tub for sandwiches or picnic lunches is very handy ( in Copenhagen, we ordered a room service breakfast which was so huge, we managed to eat our fill, then  pack a delicious picnic lunch using the tupperware tubs we had carried with us. We also filled our flask, so we could enjoy a cheap  refreshment break later! Learn a bit of the language so you can ask for “No bag please” or “Without a straw”.
  3. Indulge in a slow coffee. Instead of refusing a disposable coffee cup, take time to indulge in a slow coffee. Stop in the piazza or town square, choose a spot (sunny or shady), order a coffee and watch the world go by. Amuse yourself watching fellow tourists with their map upside down, the local family shopping, chat to your waiter and get a great recommendation for lunch.  Take time to notice your surroundings, check out  the guide book or read a book.
  4. Watch the locals. If you want to avoid lunch on a paper plate, pizza in a polystyrene container or shots in a plastic pot, watch the locals.  Observe what they order and where. Wander down side streets and find a restaurant that serves great local food. Where are the teenagers hanging out? You can bet the pizzeria they’re going to is cheap as well as tasty! At the market, look and see which stalls are filling plastic bags with fruit and avoid them. Watching the locals, it’s easy to spot which bakeries are selling baguettes in paper wrappers (or no wrapper at all), or which bar is offering tapas in glass dishes and on  real plates.
  5. Shop wisely. Do you really need to take back that novelty fridge magnet of the Basilica? Take photos to remind you of places you visit and things you see. If you must take home presents, choose local drinks, food or locally made crafts from natural materials. If you need a “thank you” gift for the neighbour who watered your plants or  fed your cat consider giving them a voucher for their favourite restaurant instead of a holiday memento. Your baggage allowance will thank you – and they probably will too!
  6. Pack sensibly. If you’re travelling by air, you’ll need to make sure your toiletries comply with airline rules. Save small sample bottles or food containers for your journey  (for years I’ve been using a child’s liquid paracetamol bottle with a child safe lid to store my shampoo). Look in your cupboards and  find uses for all those plastic containers you kept “just in case”,  instead of binning them. Use a bar of soap instead of carrying liquid shower gel, find products that multi task to help you travel light. Instead of buying a tiny toothpaste tube, I decant mine into a small bottle that once had eye drops in it. Rinsed and with the dropper made larger by cutting off the tip, it makes the perfect travel size toothpaste tube.
  7. Expect the unexpected. Even the best prepared and super efficient zero waste traveller will struggle occasionally. When this happens (your ice cream is served with a plastic scoop, or your ketchup arrives in a plastic pot), don’t get hot under the collar, explain to the vendor why you’re unhappy and maybe they’ll learn to offer them to customers instead of just supplying them automatically. Accept the small wins you’ve made  this holiday and the difference you’ve made and move on.  Enjoy being in a new place, with interesting sights and fascinating people. Enjoy your holiday.

 

Save

Save

Slow Down, You Move Too Fast (Got to Make the Moment Last).

20160325_134452OK, so that’s paraphrasing Paul Simon, but I find myself singing this hippy, trippy song on my daily walks. It makes me smile as I wander.

I don’t wear headphones when I walk. I think I would miss the sounds of nature, the blackbird singing her heart out in the trees, the laughter of kids in the forest school, even the whoops from Go Ape when I get closer to Delamere Forest car park.

I know that walking, commuting or doing chores are prime candidates for multitasking. For listening to podcasts, audiobooks or a random playlist. But I just don’t enjoy noise when I walk (or when I write / design / proof read). My brain only seems to be able to do one thing at a time. I can’t read and listen to music; I can’t walk and listen to podcasts. I can breathe fresh air and notice the world around me.

In search of slow, I wander in the woods or step out of the garden gate into the fields. I take time to look around and to listen. I mull over the tasks ahead, I dwell (too much) on yesterday’s failings or problems I can’t solve. I might meet a neighbour, also out walking; often they’ll remove one ear bud and try to hold a conversation whilst their playlist continues. A tinny background noise as we exchange village gossip (garden produce successes, a new neighbour or another house for sale).  I want to shout “Unplug yourself”!

But, shutting ourselves out from the world has become the norm. I am the odd one out on the train because I’m not constantly scrolling through my smart phone or wearing headphones. I used to worry about this. Friends told me I was leaving myself exposed, that random strangers would “bother” me, that I would feel safer and more cocooned if I took refuge in my electronic devices.

I love those random conversations; if I am occasionally “bothered” by the person next to me I move seats. More often I discover fascinating stories, a man fresh out of prison on his way to visit the son he hasn’t seen in 15 years; the grandmother off to meet her first grandchild (yes, lots of photos, plenty of proud smiles); the teenager visiting a favoured university for an open day who has never been on a train (“Mum drives us everywhere”). We once took a train trip around Europe; we met friendly, interesting people on our travels. In cafes they would recommend their favourite flavour of ice cream or tell us where to eat dinner (In Italy a waiter at our hotel told us to eat at his brother’s restaurant “I grow the wine he sells, it’s my hobby”. It was the most delicious Montepulciano I’ve ever tasted).

On my walks I learn to recognise the call of birds, to hear the wind as it rushes through leaves in autumn, I hear the crunchy frost under my feet in winter. These are my mindful moments. I don’t need a 10 minute podcast to show me how to slow down, empty my mind and let go of those anxieties that cloud my judgement, The sights and sounds of nature are all I need.

Do one thing at a time, do it well. It sounds fine in theory, but it’s so tempting to rush through the “to do” list, to move on to the next chore. My working life is governed by deadlines, sometimes I need to work late, long hours or weekends. It’s not healthy and not always productive, but necessary. Finding ways to slow down, to relish the small moments of joy keeps me balanced. If your balance is an audio book on the daily commute, then that’s fine. I’m not suggesting everyone should unplug all of the time. Maybe some of the time? Use your time in ways that are productive and satisfying, ask yourself what strategies work for you. Find your own slow.

You and me, we’re different people. There’s no right, no wrong journey the slow life. Just a gradual shift to happiness and contended living.

I tread my own path. And I’m feelin’ groovy!

  • Follow Me

  • I’m Tracey Todhunter. I’m a freelance writer. specialising in green / ethical living – with a “sideline” in craft!

  • Follow Baking and Making on WordPress.com
  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Blimey! My crochet a pumpkin workshop at @ditzyrosemakes is sold out already - thanks to everyone who has booked - there are dates planned for workshops in October & November so if you missed out on pumpkins look out for more soon (inc granny squares on 10th November).
#crochet #amigurumi #learntocrochet #lovecrochet #cheshire #ditzyrosemakery And in contrast to previous photo of moody grey sky, the sun just hit the dew on the nasturtiums!
#girlgardener #ediblegarden #naturelover #nofilter When you're enjoying a quiet mug of tea & the sound of geese becomes deafening! Seeing far more fly over the house this year (& occassionally landing in the field, calling to each other then taking off and regrouping as if they have practised for years!! Lots of red admirals in the garden today
#naturelover #redadmiral #butterfly #embracingautumn #girlgardener #wildgarden Sunday loaf. I've always baked bread -  not very successfully - but earlier this year I treated myself to a workshop with Andy, who runs the Coffee Kitchen bakery in Cockermouth. He taught us that bread making can be slow &  gentle, that bread is a living food & that inspired me to keep learning & keep experimenting. This is a 100% spelt sourdough fresh from the oven. Mr T is desperate for it to cool down so he can have a slice, thickly spread with butter! Thanks @thecoffkitchen for all your patience & advice.
#spelt #sourdough #cockermouth #notjustlakes #slowliving #theartofslowliving #naturallyleavened #morningslikethese #slowsundays #bakingandmaking #homesteading #realbread #wildyeast #slowfood My "get up and go" got up & went. Trying to restore my mojo with a walk in the forest, where it's so wet that even the squirrels look miserable! Normally I stop here to drink coffee from my flask, but it's onwards & upwards, then home for dry clothes & hot chocolate!
#dailywalk #forestwalk #woodland #embracingautumn
  • Previously on the blog…

  • Recent Posts

  • Categories

  • Currently Reading (not sponsored): No Serial Number

  • Products I love (not sponsored): 9 Meals from Anarchy Veg Stock

  • Engaging the Public with Climate Change (Co Author):

  • Crochet: Learn It, Love It (Author)

  • Woman’s Weekly Guide to Crochet (Author):

  • The Drift Collection (Contributor):

  • Whimsical Hats (Contributor):

  • Hand Made (Contributor):

  • Dorling KIndersely Guide to Crochet (Contributor)

  • The Legal Stuff: