April in the Sidebar

Eagle eyed readers will have spotted a few new “faces” in the sidebar this month.  Remember, nobody pays to be featured in the sidebar, I just choose great stuff that I’ve tried and loved. When I sat down to write this I noticed there’s a bit of a masculine  theme to this month’s selection.  Three great companies that I’m sure you’ll be hearing lots about.

 

Let’s start with 9 Meals from Anarchy. I love these guys! I first met Tom and Matt when I interviewed them for a feature on their new veg box scheme a couple of years ago. Back then they had just taken over a tiny small holding on the edge of my village. Today they’re settling in to a new, larger plot and producing this fabulous vegetable stock. There are a few (and growing) stockists, but you can also buy it mail order. I can confirm the postal service is great, your stock will arrive safely wrapped and ready to add to stocks and stews.  We need more Veg Men in the world right now.

Next up is Lakeland Muesli. We first tried this toasted artisan muesli at the Cockermouth Food Fair last year and loved it. Even more I love their story. Like many people born and raised in Cumbria they’ve been trying to find their way back home and starting Lakeland Mues has been part of that “grand plan”.  There are plenty of stockists around Cumbria now selling it (But not enough), so if you’re heading up to the Lakes this year look out for it. It’s fuelling Mr T’s Fred Whitton training and I’ve had no complaints so far! My favourite is the Artman Classic  – but guys, if you ever want to trial a coconut free variety – I’m your gal! You can also buy mail order, so no excuses. It’s far tastier than those faux artisan cereals you buy in fancy cardboard boxes in the supermarket!

Lastly Nom Nom Chocolate. Made in Wales I first discovered it in my local farm shop. I’ll admit I’m a sucker for packaging – but once I tasted it – wow! It’s delicious! We’re partial to the salted caramel, but there always seems to be something new to discover. Once again, check out the stockists lists or buy online.

You can click on the links to visit the websites or find all three on social media.

Have a delicious  weekend x

PS I just want to say a huge thank you to everyone who commented on my last post. I’ve been quite overwhelmed by how many of you have shared your stories on here, Facebook, Twitter and particularly Instagram. There will be a follow up post shortly, but I think it’s pretty clear that we’re all struggling one way or another and it doesn’t hurt to say so occasionally.

Clinging to the Wreckage

CRUMMOCK BLOGEver since my Lupus diagnosis I’ve been in denial about just how much it has shaped my life. I realised I’ve been “clinging to the wreckage” of what I thought my “old life” was like. Scared to let go and embrace the fresh challenges that life now brings me. It’s hard to explain to someone who hasn’t experienced long term illness just how it affects daily life. People ask “How are you?” and of course I answer “Oh, I’m fine, mustn’t grumble.. you know…”. What I really want to say is that today was a “good day”. I managed to get myself vertical by 9am, dress, eat breakfast and meet  a friend for coffee. I spent the afternoon “in recovery” on the sofa, my legs refusing to hold me upright because the effort of simply washing my hair, getting dressed and out of the house was  as much as my body could take for one day.  These things you take for granted, that you do without thinking are herculean tasks for me on a “bad” day -and here’s the cruellest thing – I never know when a bad day is coming. I might have a lovely week, plenty of sleep and little stress. Then a sarky email or snide remark will send my stress levels soaring. I’ll lie awake worrying about a friend going through a rough patch and Bam! I can’t even get out of bed and dress myself.

I tell you this is in the spirit of “full disclosure”. So that when you tell me how well I look or how “lucky” I am that my husband “lets” me stay at home all day instead of having a “real” job or jokingly call me a “slacker” because I answered the door in my PJs at 3 in the afternoon you may understand why you get the rough edge of my tongue or the benefit of my great repetoire in sarcastic one liners. I’d love to have a “proper” job, but try explaining to an employer that you can’t work mornings or that double vision brought on by fatigue stops you getting behind the wheel on a regular basis. Self employment really is my only option. Ask me about the freelance life and I’ll wax lyrical about the freedom to choose my own hours, work from home. But the truth is I envy you your mundane 9 – 5.

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We spent Easter week in Cockermouth at my Mother in Law’s.  “Lovely daughter” came over for a few days and in between over consumption of chocolate eggs we managed a cosy Mother – Daughter lunch in town, a mooch around the shops and best of all, a family outing to Crummock.

This place holds special significance for me. It’s one of the first places Mr T took me to when we first met. We used to give our dog a regular  bath in the lake and it’s where Mr T tried unsuccessfully to teach his little girl (and his wife) how to skim stones. My M-i-L is dismissive about it’s charms. The walk is too flat, there are too many tourists and you have to pay for parking. All this is true; and yes, you have to dodge toddlers in wellies too big and dog walkers who haven’t quite mastered the extending lead. But you’ll be rewarded with some of the finest views to be had at ground level.

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I love this place, no steep gradients mean I can walk further and for longer without pleading tiredness. There are benches where you simply “must” stop and admire the view. It’s a chance to breathe fresh air, to reflect and just occasionally have a moment of clarity. All of a sudden I realised, that by denying the daily struggles and  by pretending all is well and life is lovely I was kidding myself more than anyone. The fact is life can be shit. Not just for me, but for all of us. Mr T has many crappy days at the office, my neighbour has MS and endures far more than I do. Another friend is a carer, another recently bereaved. There are days when we all have crappy lives.

So, here on a shingle beach, with the sun trying hard to shine through grey skies I reached an epiphany of sorts. I’m going to stop pretending life is great when it isn’t. But equally, I’m going to do my best to find the sunshine on every rainy day. So yes, it took me until lunch time to get of bed the day we went to Crummock and I didn’t have a shower or wash my hair first. But I got to see lambs in the field, hold Mr T’s hand as we walked and do the things normal people do.

No more excuses. No more pretty Instagram pics posted from bed giving truth to the lie that all is well when it’s not. Instead, lots of laughter at my own expense. An admission that mooching around in PJs for most of the day is acceptable every once in a while – anyway – that’s practically uniform for most freelancers isn’t it? A late lunch with friends instead of morning coffee is OK and admitting that an evening in the pub means a morning in bed (and not because of a hang over) is not an admission of failure. It’s time to let go of what might have been and accept what will be.

Feel free to remind me of this optimism and positive attitude next time I bend your ear about how unfair life is. Then pour me strong coffee, cut me a large slice of cake and join me on the sofa. I didn’t choose to live life in the slow lane, but you know what? It’s a pretty darned good place to be.

Review: Sugru

17157423_10155043812785912_8639739388407831482_oRegular readers will know that we’re big fans of Sugru in the Todhunter household, so when I was offered one of their new “Create and Craft” packs of course I said yes. The Create and Craft pack is one of a new series of kits available now. You can also pick up “Organise Small Spaces” , “Hacks for Your Home” and more (click here for all the latest special editions and kits). Each kit contains everything you need to get started with Sugru and “hack” your home, garage or craft table. They would make great gifts for the diy enthusiast or crafter (or those hard to buy for uncles, brother in laws etc).

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The Create and Craft pack contains a handy tin with four packs of Sugru and a couple of useful texturising tools. Best of all, there’s a booklet filled with creative ideas and suggestions for using this brilliant mouldable glue. Whether you need to add a comfort grip to a pair of scissors, make a stamp for a quick printed wrapping paper or fix almost anything, then you need a pack of Sugru in your life. It’s strong, flexible, grippy and reliable. We made a “running repair” to our favourite cafetiere three years ago and it’s still holding up to daily use. You can find dozens of craft and design ideas over on the Sugru website.  My current favourite is this personalised mug “how to”.

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If you’ve not tried Sugru, look out for it in DIY stores, or sign up for the Sugru newsletter to get 10% off your first order. Do check out Sugru for yourself – and bookmark this handy zip fix tutorial – it’s been well road tested in this house and really works!

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My top tip for more Sugru inspiration is to follow the team on Instagram for loads of  diy / upcycling tips and dozens of crafty ideas to make.

Thanks again Sugru x

 

 

 

Capturing nature

20160723_171515For most of last year I had a personal project to try and capture the colour and textures of my garden. It was a lovely change from the challenges of commercial design work and it made the contrast between my personal designs and my commission work even more obvious.

It’s been a difficult struggle, to reconcile my beliefs in sustainable textiles and natural processes with the commercial demand for “budget” makes that many of my clients have been asking for. Acrylic yarns in particular are not “environmentally friendly”, they aren’t biodegradeable, the process of making is energy intensive and the brightly coloured dyes are often harmful, chemical based products. So,  I’ve tried to separate my commercial design work from my personal projects.

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Dyeing yarn using plant materials (not extracts or commercial dye stuff) has been a challenge and a steep learning curve. But I am loving the results and the colours I’ve achieved. Inevitably this has led on to exploring other natural processes and rediscovering some of the techniques I used in my teaching days.

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This year I’m exploring ways to capture different landscapes and locations that have a personal connection for me. It’s been good for me to learn new techniques and to spend time with other artists and practitioners who are willing to share their knowledge and enthusiasm for natural processes.

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Of course I’ll still be publishing knitting and crochet designs (which you can find over at Granny Cool) and in future issues of Inside crochet magazine I have some fantastic designs which make the best of British Wool including (finally!) the  pattern for this gorgeous crochet bag pictured here in my favourite Herdwick wool.

An Indulgent Weekend

16864106_1186849991433338_4226166083667145784_nI spent the weekend in Saltaire at textile artist Hannah Lamb’s studio. The workshop title intrigued me, “Patchwork and Place” seemed to fit so well with my own current work in progress, which aims to record places and events through stitch and textiles. My Garden Remembered (working title) project to record our own garden now continues into year two and the techniques and ideas sparked by my weekend with Hannah have moved my plans in a different direction.

16939544_1186850018100002_2624248069481218477_nOn day one, Hannah introduced us to the technique of cyanotype printing and immediately it was obvious to me that this could be the ideal way to record the flora and fauna of the garden in a way that complements last year’s experiments with solar dyes. I came home and searched through my old “teacher box” until I found some sun print paper. Using the leaves I pressed last summer along with bird feathers collected from the garden I managed some very pretty first efforts. I am now planning a whole series of pieces – once again  harnessing the power of the sun seems to be the theme of this years “garden captures”. Hannah is running an introduction to cyanotype course at her studio in May, if this is a technique that intrigues you I would definitely recommend Hannah – she is generous with her knowledge – and encouragement.16996267_1186849834766687_4976128420989220223_nThe second day was spent constructing patchwork and stitched pieces using the fabrics we had prepared on Saturday. This was tricky for me as I have never done any patchwork. I watched, asked questions and after some perseverance I did manage to finish my sample at home on Monday. I’m not sure that formal / traditional patchwork comes naturally to me. It requires patience, straight lines and a degree of accuracy that doesn’t come easily.  Like all hand stitching, the slow, meditative process of joining one piece to another was a joy. I shall definitely be working on my English paper piecing skills this year.

16998031_1186849881433349_3778062752372984237_n.jpgMr T kindly paid for my workshop as part of my Christmas present. Secretly I think he was glad of a weekend to himself, to watch the rugby uninterrupted and not be nagged to do weekend chores. For me, it was a lovely chance to observe another artist at work, to learn new skills and spend time with a lovely group of sewing enthusiasts. A weekend away might seem like an indulgence, but I think that time away has “recharged my batteries”, given me permission to be creative without the pressure of making a commercial design or a product to sell. Today I’ve been hard at work researching a new textile project that won’t involve crochet or knitting, it’s early days and so I have nothing to share yet (just scribbled notes in my sketch book , a rapidly filling Pinterest board and a shopping list that reads like a chemistry lesson). I’ve also been researching the mills of Cockermouth and discovering what a huge part linen cloth and thread played in the development of the town. There are exciting times ahead, and they definitely involve stitching…

Will Crochet Design Make Your Fortune?

Or, How do you measure success?

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OK, I’m talking about crochet design here, but this applies to all creatives. The truth is, most creative occupations won’t earn you a fortune. There are exceptions. Talent,  hard work and lucky breaks have led to a few highly successful careers in knitwear design (and other sectors).  We think that getting published in a few magazines, getting a book deal or hitting the “hot right now” stream in Ravelry* will be a spring board to fame and fortune. It might, but the chances are you won’t be able to give up the day job just yet. At least not if you’re responsible for mortgage payments, rent or  food and living expenses. Freelance crochet design will not bring you financial security. There are a few who are trying and succeeding. Talented people who have invested heavily in self publishing, mastered the art of online promotion and built a following of makers who leap on every new design with gusto. These are the lucky few. (although it isn’t really down to luck;  hard work, determination and the support of friends and family all contribute).

So, if financial security  isn’t guaranteed how else do we measure our success ?  Does it matter if money in the bank isn’t the bottom line? Freedom to live a simple life, cook from scratch, grow veg and spend time with friends and loved ones is my “success indicator”. If I worked full time, invested heavily in my brand and really, really committed myself to design then I would earn more money. But, all of the above would be neglected. I know that when I spent two days working  in London each week there were too many ready meals in the freezer, a weedy veg patch and a sulky family who  missed me. I lost touch with friends and spent weekends filled with working mother guilt trying to compensate for time spent away and  texting goodnight from trains. I felt like I failed at everything and I resented my job and my family for not being able to cope without me. The money was great, but it didn’t compensate for the things I missed.

Crochet design, writing features and occasional books won’t make my fortune, but it has brought me friendship and  job satisfaction. The money I earn feeds our family, feeds my yarn habit and most importantly sustains my creative soul. My riches aren’t money in the bank, they are small flashes of delight in an ordinary life. Of course, none of this would be possible if Mr T didn’t have a successful, rewarding job. But that doesn’t mean my work is just “play”. We have found our own “work life balance”. but it has taken us 30 years to get here!

So, will crochet make your fortune? Perhaps  not, but maybe that’s not why you crochet?

Photo Credit: Giulia Bertelli for Unsplash

 

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Can Your Blog Make You Money?

laptop.jpgA few years ago I was on a training course run by the NUJ for freelance writers. One of the subjects covered was how to make money from your blog, it was really popular among the freelancers, and for very good reasons. In this digital age it’s harder and harder to get work unless you have a great online showcase. So, the theory goes, if you’re spending all this time investing in your blog / website or social media it should earn its keep. So, how do you earn money from your blog? I stopped to think about the ways my blog makes me money and here’s just a few of the strategies I’ve tried, with varying degrees of success.

  1. Sponsored content.If a company sends you stuff for free and you write about it on your blog, that’s sponsored content. This is one of the most common ways  bloggers work for free. It’s not unusual for a craft blogger to be sent yarn, crochet hooks or books. They  might be asked to design a pattern and share it on their blog (or the company’s website) –  a great way to try out new yarns and tools – and great free endorsement for the company. Keep a note of the value of “free stuff” you’re sent, it might count as income when you complete your tax return. Ask yourself how much free work you’re prepared to undertake and look carefully at ways it might lead to a paid commission. Here’s a great post from Stephanie Lau, which shows how to credit those freebies and still create fabulous content. Most of the sponsored content on this blog is product reviews. Often I’ll approach a publisher directly and request a review copy of a new book I think my readers might like. Sometimes PR companies offer to send me stuff they think I might want to try. I’m happy with this arrangement and it works for me.
  2. Advertorial. You’ll be familiar with this if you ever read glossy magazines; when you think you’re reading a great article and suddenly realise it’s just a clever  advert. The best advertorial weaves a story  and makes you think this is a product (or products you can’t do without). If you are interested in how to write “killer” advertorial, this post is a great example of how it can be done well*. You are more likely to be paid for advertorial if you have a measurable following or can demonstrate the extent of your readership. It’s good practice to let readers know you’re being paid to write content, don’t try and pretend you just “went out and bought” that top of the range model or latest “must have” handbag, be honest and your readers will respect you more.
  3. Sidebar advertising. If there is an online shop or company you think your readers might like then a sidebar advert can be a great way to let them know about it. Decide how much you think space on your blog is worth and approach a short list of companies with your proposal. I also use the side bar to show case companies I work with as a thank you for their support. I currently have a few sidebar adverts and affiliate links (see below), I use analytics to measure how many readers click on them. I can use this to decide what kind of adverts and links are most relevant for readers of my blog and tailor content to suit.
  4. Affiliate links. There are plenty of online stores that run affiliate schemes and these can be a great way to earn extra income if you’re prepared to put in a little effort. Here’s another post by Stephanie Lau which shows just how to make affiliate links relevant to your content. Sidebar links and affiliate links can be an easy way to earn passive income (or money for doing nothing!) Once you’ve set up your links and adverts you’ll earn money every time a reader clicks through and buys. This only works successfully if you choose links and ads that are relevant to your readers. By analysing who clicks where on my website  I’ve discovered my readers are far more likely to click through to small independent shops than the “big boys” like Amazon or Love Knitting. This has helped me plan a marketing strategy for the year ahead which is more likely to bring me income.
  5. Paid Content. Unlike most  “guest blogging”, where you might be invited to write content for another  blog for free (or in return for “exposure bucks”**). Paid content actually rewards you for the work you do. There are lots of online journals and websites which pay writers. You can find lists online or get yourself a listing in online directories such as the NUJ Freelance Directory (for members only). If you are approached to write blog posts, contribute free patterns or tutorials think about how much time you spend creating that content and ask yourself how much you are prepared to give away for free.

There are literally hundreds more ways you can make money from your blog and there are lots of websites that can give you tips and ideas. You might want to head over to Kat Goldin’s blog and read this piece on passive income streams which was written with designers in mind. Also worth reading, this article from Standard Issue magazine talks about the role of “the influencer” and is well worth a read for anyone thinking of ways to make money from their online presence.

Will you lose readers if you start placing adverts, accepting sponsored content and using affiliate links? Not if you are honest about it and keep your readers entertained. Telling them about a great product and then giving them a link to where they can buy it is really helpful, and if it earns you a few pennies along the way then it’s a “win win”. Take a fresh look at your favourite blogs and podcasts, take note of how they use sponsored content, ads and affiliate links. Perhaps start with a product review or  include a recommendation in your newsletter. Try to avoid the “Yes, I’m being paid to tell you about this, but honestly,  I’d tell you anyway because I love it” trap. Instead tell your readers why you think they’d  like it and how it helped you.

Do you make money from your blog? I’d love to know what works (and what doesn’t) for you.

Photo credit: Dai KE for Unsplash

*I’ve no idea if this is a genuine post or if it’s sponsored / paid for content. But it’s  perfect example of how to weave product descriptions into your blog in an engaging way.

** Exposure bucks – a fantasy currency paid by big companies in return for your time, skills and effort. Sadly banks and supermarkets don’t accept this as legal tender so be careful how much work  you undertake for “free publicity”, links to your website or shout outs on  social media. 

 

Goodbye to Old Friends

croppedwelliesI’ve been wearing these Ilse Jacobson boots for more than 10 years. Pulled on every day they’ve been warm, reliable and incredibly comfortable. I have loved them. They’re made from natural rubber, have a thick sole and a fleecy lining. Perfect for mucking out ponies, walking dogs, gardening or scrubbed up for a photo shoot. People can’t help but comment on them –  I should really have been on commission – I must have sold at least a dozen pairs.

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Just before Christmas I realised that these beautiful,  worn in wellies would not see me through another winter. They have been patched, glued and mended too many times.  After two pairs of the same red lace up wellies I wondered if it was time to try something new and Mr T kindly bought me some Seasalt wellies  for Christmas (I’ll share when I get round to photographing them). They don’t have the same warm lining or the same style, and everyone says “Oh, Seasalt wellies – snap.” when I wear them. That’s not   bad thing of course, and I do have a deep love for all things Seasalt, but I do like to be just  a little bit different. I like to do the unexpected occasionally.

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I love these red wellies so much though, maybe I’ll just keep them as photo props. That would be OK wouldn’t it?

So, You Want to be a Writer?

s9cc2skysjm-green-chameleonWhenever I tell people I’m a writer the most common response is “I’ve always wanted to be writer, but I don’t know how”.  I have always been compelled to write, I never really stopped to think about the how. The first story I remember writing was science fiction. I was 7 years old and a babysitter had left behind a Marvel comic. I was fascinated by a picture book for grown ups  and wrote story after story about the figures sketched in its pages. In my teens I found my niche writing features and after the local paper published my first piece when I was 15 I was determined that’s what I would do for a living, it didn’t become my full time job until my 40’s, but it’s simmered along while l I did other jobs that paid the bills and put food on the table.  I still long to write a novel and there is a character inside me who insists his story should be told, but I’m not ready to give him a life of his own yet. For now, I walk briskly in the forest as his fictional life evolves in my head.

Now, I’ll let you into a secret. Writing is easy, you just pick up a pen and get on with it. Writing something other people want to read, now that’s the hard bit! I used to be a teacher, then a teacher trainer. I’ve taught everyone, from three year olds to pensioners and the same advice is relevant to all of you. Practice, practice, practice. Like riding a bike or learning the piano, writing is a skill that rewards effort. Here’s my top three tips to being a better writer, follow these and you can only get better (and if that’s prompted a D:Ream earworm click here and sing along).

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Number One: Write. Write every day. Keep a journal, write a diary, hand write a letter to an old friend. Make up a story about the couple sitting in front of you on the bus, pen a poem. Don’t worry about the spelling, the grammar or  the syntax, just type or scribble down the words. Do this every day and soon you’ll discover a style, your “voice”. You’ll find it easier to write that first sentence, If you really struggle,  there are websites with writing prompts to get you started. Make time every day to write something. Even if you can only manage ten minutes, you’ll find the discipline of daily writing soon becomes something you look forward to. Start a blog, write a daily Facebook update (my lovely friend Archies Diaries started that way and became an Amazon best seller!), make a list of far away friends and family and write them a letter. Plan your novel and give yourself a word or page target for every day. Full disclosure – some of best writing happens in my head on my daily walk and never makes it to paper – I need to learn to take my own advice.

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Number Two: Read. Read “all” the time. Honestly, being a great reader will make you a better writer. Widen your horizons, whether you borrow library books, read online or pick up your books second hand it doesn’t matter. Reading improves your vocabulary, teaches you about plot development and structure. It widens your world. If you worry about grammar, spelling or the conventions of writing then you need to read more, you’ll soon notice how great writers break the “rules”. Think about your favourite writers, study how they structure their work, what makes it so appealing to you. It’s never good form to copy another writer’s work, but being inspired by a story you’ve read and using it as  a spring board for your own work is perfectly acceptable. After I read Freya North’s The Turning Point I was so devastated by the ending that I had to write myself an alternative future for the heroine, Frankie and her children. Not because Freya North had done a bad job – the complete opposite – in three days of binge reading  I had lived and breathed with her heroine and reaching the final page  was too painful, I wasn’t ready to let her go. *

Number Three: Ignore the rules. If you spend your days stressing that your spelling is abysmal or your grammar and punctuation let you down, stop worrying. Get the words on the page and everything else can be dealt with later. Run your work through a spell checker, find a friend who will proof read and edit (don’t choose one who gets carried away with the red pen. It can be soul destroying to have your work returned with hundreds of minor corrections). If you really believe you have produced a piece of work fit to show an editor, find yourself a professional proof reader or technical editor  who will lick your work into shape (for a small fee of course). There will be days when you have nothing to say, or times when you reach a block (believe me that exists), after my last book I lost my “mojo” for several months. All I could write were hasty postcards and a few short paragraphs for patient editors who understood and gave me time to recover. My design work stalled completely. Samples were made and ready to post, but I just couldn’t type the words needed into the pattern template.

Of course, most of this advice is just stating the obvious, you knew all this already. Perhaps you’ve just been waiting for someone to give you permission to write. In which case, close this tab. Open a word document;  call it “My Writing” and type your first sentence. I look forward to an invitation to read your first blog post, attend your book launch or just get a letter, written by hand.

Go write x

*You should note that the Turning Point is the most beautifully crafted novel and it’s only if you read it that you’ll understand my sens of losse when I finished reading.

Photo Credits:

Green Chameleon for Unsplash

Parker Byrd for Unsplash

Aaron Burden for Unsplash

 

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A Weekend in Pictures

Weekends are for sitting by the fire, reading books, drinking coffee and indulgence. At least that’s the plan. It rarely happens in this house! I’ve been indulging in a lazy weekend, relishing time alone with just box sets and chick lit for company.

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I cleaned my boots – oh that colour! These boots make me smile every time I wear them. . It’s just a bonus that my scarf is all matchy matchy! Note to self, if you decide to walk over the fields to buy the weekend papers, don’t wear suede boots!

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I made a pot of coffee and sat by the fire. I read trashy chick lit on my  Kindle and I watched  Greys Anatomy (again).

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I did some weeding, and when it got dark I came inside. I opened a bottle of wine and sat by the fire. I read the  papers and I watched Greys Anatomy (again).

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I ate left overs for breakfast. I did as I pleased. I gave myself permission to step off the work / design / housework treadmill. I had the best weekend. If this is slow living I am definitely happy in the slow lane. I hope your weekend was happy too.

Here’s to Monday x

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  • Pretty!
 Took Mr T to Chester Maker's Market today. Ho got pie, I came home with pretty yarn from @joannawoodpaint (oh and cheese, curry sauce, cake, more cheese, smoked salmon and secret presents for lovely friends oh and cheese -with rioja and caramelised onion - have you guessed we love cheese!!)! Really hope you make this a regular @_makersmarket xxx
#knittersofinstagram #handdyed #indiedyer #sockyarn #madenotmanufactured #100daysofwool Gin! Not just any old gin - Scottish gin from @inshriach now available. Sorry Walter - photo shamelessly nicked from your feed - but oh my - how fabulous! Go check this one out ladies (& gents) I just know it's going to be fabulous!
I'll be pouring myself a large g&t later and raising a glass to everyone who read or commented on my last post. We're definitely stronger together. Have a lovely weekend everyone xxx

#knitterslovegin #gin #scottishgin #gincredible #ginfriday #ginoclock #inshriach #madenotmanufactured Ruby chard, freshly picked. Going to saute it with chorizo for tea...
In other news I've got a new blog post up (link in profile) if you want to know what it's like living with a chronic illness start here...going to a bit more honest about my real life from now on.
#slowlived #thisthingcalledslowliving #bakingandmaking #ediblegarden #mygardenrightnow #permaculture #plottoplate Sometimes the best view is the one right on your doorstep. Just before I hung the washing on the line I decided to sit down, drink my coffee & be grateful... #bakingandmaking #thisthingcalledslowliving #slowlived #theartofslowliving #morningslikethese #mygardenrightnow #permaculture Old socks, new socks. Can't resist trying on newly cast off socks. On the left "old" socks in @kingcoleltd zig zag & on the right "new" socks in @coopknits Socks Yeah. 
#operationsockdrawer #toeupsocks #socksyeah #igknitters #madenotmanufactured #makeitwearit #toeuptuesday #toeupsocks #100daysofwool Weathered and worn... Beautiful, even in the rain... No knitting, just walking & enjoying the view xxx The sun is trying to come out. Wool in all it's natural undyed glory. Local, breed specific wools are the best! 
#100daysofwool #britishwool #britishyarn #herdwick #hebridean #choosewool #britishsheepbreeds 100 days of wool ... Found these lurking in my stash left over from one of last year's designs. I love all @thefibrecompany yarns, but this one is my favourite, it's a blend of wool and mohair (even a bit of British wool in there) soft to knit with, washes well & comes on all my favourite colours. Now I'm off to visit my favourite coffee shop & plan some Easter knitting...
#igknitters #100daysofwool #britishwool #lovewool #madenotmanufactured #shoplocal #notjustlakes Waste nothing. Even the tiniest bits of leftover wool can make stuff that is useful & beautiful. Collect your scraps, follow your favourite sleeve pattern and make arm warmers! 
#lovewool #loveknitting #lovewoolhatewaste #choosewool #madenotmanufactured #makersgonnamake #choosewool #zerowaste #permaculture #reloved #repurposed #upcycle #100daysofwool A good day to dry socks! I love wearing wool & knit most of my own socks (toe up, fleegle heel because I'm too lazy to graft toes or pick up stitches!!) My favourite yarns are Eden Cottage ayarns Milburn 4 ply, Sirdar Heart & Sole, Patons Kroy & West Yorkshire Spinners sock wool.
#100daysofwool #toeupsocksrock #toeuptuesday #fleegleheel #choosewool #igknitters #sockknittersofinstagram #makeitwearit Sunday blues. A gorgeous blend of merino & cotton called Coast, bought from @tangledyarnuk . I love wool / cotton blends, especially when they come in such fabulous denim shades. 
#100daysofwool #choosewool #yarnlove #tangledyarnuk #doubledenim #denim #sundayblues Hands wearing handmade things holding little things... pattern for the Cavendish beanie & wristwarmers now up on love crochet & ravelry (follow link in profile). Credits: yarn is gorgeous @westyorkshirespinners beautiful styling by @clairemontyknits & photo  @mavricphotography
#crochetaddict #britishwool #100daysofwool #makersgonnamake #lovecrochet #horgolás  #uncinetto #crochetconcupiscence #crochetgirlgang #choosewool Frivolous flowers! I loved using @bordertart 's indigo yarn for this design. It has such gorgeous sheen. The pattern first appeared in @insidecrochet & is now available to download online (link in profile). I just love everything about this beautiful photo!
Credits: photo @lucymakesmyheartskip styling @clairemontyknits 
#lovecrochet #indiedyer #choosewool #crochetaddict #uncinetto  #insidecrochetmagazine #indigo #naturaldye  #merino More garter stitch love. Stripes & garter stitch are perfect partners. Knitted on the bias using simple increases & decreases makes a perfect draping wrap.Knitted with 1 ball each of Wendy Ramsdale & Louisa Harding's Grace hand dyed from my stash.
#100daysproject #100daysofwool #wipwednesday #britishwool Playing hooky! I'm suposes to be working on a crochet commission (a huge cabled blanket that's taking forever), but I am giving myself the afternoon off to enjoy this gorgeous blend of natural fibres.  I've just ordered more because it knits & crochets like a dream.
 #madewiththefibreco #tangledyarnuk #the100dayproject #100daysofwool
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