Recipe: Sticky Stuff Remover

How to remove sticky labels

I make lots of jams, flavoured gins and preserves. That means I’m always scavenging empty bottles and jars to store my produce. Every jar is washed and the original label removed – but sometimes that’s easier said than done! Some labels are so firmly glued on, nothing seems to shift them! You can buy “goo gone”  or “sticky stuff remover” products, and some people swear by WD40, but I wanted to see if I could come up with my own. Usually I scrape off as much of the label as I can, then soak in hot, soapy water. If I’m lucky, the label slides off and doesn’t leave a sticky residue. Occasionally, nothing works and even huge amounts of elbow grease (which, incidentally is the best cleaner available)  won’t shift the darned glue – what do they use to stick those labels?

You can see from the photo below, even my all singing, all dancing recipe won’t work 100% of the time (that clear plastic bottle has defeated me), but most of the bottles are clean and label free. Ready to be filled with lotions, potions and produce from my kitchen garden (look out for my lavender champagne recipe, coming soon).

So, what’s my “secret” recipe? Simple, good old trusty baking soda (also known as bicarbonate of soda)* and vegetable oil! You’ll also need a dash of perseverance and plenty of elbow grease (for the uninitiated, that’s good old fashioned wrist / arm scrubbing action).

Simply mix equal quantities of oil and baking soda in a dish and apply to any remaining glue or label. Leave for up to an hour before scrubbing off with wire wool, an old toothbrush or your favourite eco friendly abrasive cloth (I use the Body Shop hemp body mitts, they are great for household tasks). The baking soda is the star of the show here, the oil just binds it and stops it sliding off the jars and bottles. You can use any oil, some blogs recommend coconut oil, others olive oil*.

how to remove sticky labels the after photo.jpg

Wipe off the oil / baking soda residue and rinse your jars in hot soapy water and leave to dry. Remember they will need to be washed, dried and sterilised before use to avoid risk of contamination.

Once you’ve filled your jars, you’ll need to label them with contents and an ingredients list. The best labels I’ve found for the job come from Eco Craft. They also offer  free pdf templates for their labels, which are very handy and save a lot of time setting up your own.

Not so difficult eh? Like most home made cleaning products and home remedies, the most valuable ingredient is time. I like to keep a jar of baking soda by the sink (clearly labelled), so that I can use it for all kinds of cleaning tasks. It’s great for removing burnt on food from roasting pans, or getting stubborn stains off the coffee maker too.

 

  • Health and safety note: Whenever you’re making your own eco –  friendly products, remember to wear rubber gloves and an apron. The ingredients might be less toxic, but they can still cause irritation and can stain your clothing. Always use clean containers and avoid mixing shop bought cleaners with your home made ones  as chemical reactions can occur. Wash all surfaces and utensils after use.
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