A Very Nice House in the Country

Oh my, look at this garden. How lucky am I to sit out and stare at this every day?

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June 2016

To paraphrase Blur, we live in a very nice house in the country – how lucky are we? Technically it’s a bungalow, but we’re not going to quibble over the lack of an upstairs are we? One of the advantages of living in our “very nice house” is the beautiful garden we’ve created.  When we moved in there was just a lawn and a Silver Birch tree. No flower beds, no borders, just a lonely tree and a mouldering wooden bench. We’ve spent 20 years creating this garden and I can tell you where almost every plant came from. You know how I feel about full disclosure, so let’s give Mr T credit for his contribution to this garden transformation, which amounts to lawn mowing, dead pet burying and shed building! In the early days we had strict rules, whatever we bought had to earn it’s keep. That meant edible or evergreen, preferably both. We begged and stole plants from friends and neighbours, I sowed seeds and took cuttings. 20 years on I can see that all that early work was worth it. My garden gives me joy every day.

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Ruby Chard 2017

Our garden also feeds us – literally and spiritually – nothing helps restore balance better than sitting by the fire, drinking beer and eating food you’ve grown yourself. I’d like to say it’s deliberate, but it’s definitely the result of a lack of energy and inclination that we also have a bounty of free food in the form of weeds and wild flowers that flourish in our borders and in the hedges.

I’m busy transplanting seedling in the greenhouse, watching carefully for signs of activity in the perennial beds and getting excited about our first nettle soup of the year (we’ve already had risotto and gnocchi, soup is for the later, tougher stems).

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Nettle soup topped with creme fraiche and chives

It feels good to grow food; it feels even better that now we are able to find room for flowers and decorative shrubs that do little more than look pretty for a few weeks each year (but that’s OK too, they give me joy and that makes them pretty useful in my book). They’re also finding their way into dye pots, releasing magical colour and helping me find new ways of recording the memory of the garden (because one day we’ll move from here and I want to have something to take away).

In the last few years I’ve also noticed that gardens are pretty forgiving. Veg patches don’t mind if you occasionally forget to weed or to thin young plants. When the grass gets too long it gives the dandelions time to flourish (young leaves for salads, flowers for the dye pot and roots for our favourite dandelion and burdock recipes). Because we back onto farmland we’ve learned to accept that nettles and cleavers will always “win” if you try to control them, so instead we eat young nettle shoots and as a bonus the butterflies lay their eggs. Neater gardeners might frown at our lack of order, but for me it’s a bonus. Our garden is filled with all manner of wildlife and self seeded gems.

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Nasturtiums – essential salad garnish!

If there’s a lesson to be learned in letting my garden grow a little wilder these days it’s that the unexpected can bring good as well as bad. Not being in control is OK.

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  • I’m Tracey Todhunter. I’m a freelance writer. specialising in green / ethical living – with a “sideline” in craft!

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  • Today I have been planning recipes, working on new design commissions - and tidying my small, but perfectly formed  stash of beautiful British wool!
#bririshwool #britishfibre #wool #stashenhancement #minimalism #knittersofinstagram #crochet Slow down, look around you and see the beauty in small things. Breathe fresh air, watch sunsets, make time for friendship, love and laughter. 
A bit philosophical for a wet Tuesday morning, felt the need to remind myself there is beauty in the ordinary. 
#slowliving #naturelovers #foraging #permaculture #homesteading #keepthewildinyou #hedgerows #beautyintheordinary Major dessert envy last night - Mr T chose the baked alaska - need to go back & try this for myself! Delicious food, great service & my "Heaton Mess" was delicious!! Oh and the gin menu - superb! If you find yourself in Newcastle check this place out - Chillingham Rd. Xxx
#heaton #puddinglove #newcastle #eatingout #instafood #foodphotography #bakedalaska Passionflower. One of the joys of our holiday this year was stumbling across the unexpected. We walked past a garden fence covered in these flowers & their ripening fruit. In my schoolgirl French I asked the elderly gentleman if I could take a photo, in better English than my French he invited us in to admire his plot. You can read more about him on the blog, where I've also been writing about how having too much can be a good thing - even if you're a minimalist!
#slowliving #minimalism #permaculture #ediblegarden #girlgardener #zerowaste #livingwithless #bakingandmaking #homesteading #simplethings Star baker! Finally got a photo of me wearing my new sweatshirt, bought from @mirandagorebrowne I ♥♥♥ it so much. The fabric is soft, it fits really well and now washed 3 times it still looks like new! Go buy one before they sell out (also available: "nice buns" & "jammy dodger")
#starbaker #gbbo #kitchenschool #bakemeacakeasfastasyoucan  #bakersofinstagram #baking #lovelythings #instafood #eatme I miss this view so much. Even our current view of sunset over the wheat fields can't compare to a French field of sunflowers!
#naturelover #sunflowers #yellow #countryliving #slowliving #simplethings #keepthewildinyou #floral #seaofflowers #seekthesimplicity #pursuepretty
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